Yogic Breathing For Hypnosis: 3 Easy Techniques To Ground & Relax Your Clients Before Inducing A Hypnotic Trance [Includes Infographic]

When it comes to healing practices, often the best practitioners call on a variety of tools when working with clients. In this article, we’re going to look at the benefits of yogic breathing for hypnosis, and 3 easy techniques to ground and relax your clients before inducing a hypnotic trance.

So let’s dive on in…

One of the reasons hypnosis is so popular is due to how streamlined, fast and effective it is; sometimes you can get to the core of an issue in as little as one session.

There’s no doubt about it… once your subject or client is in a hypnotic trance, and you’re equipped with the right techniques, you can help them resolve everything from fears and phobias, to overcoming anxiety and self-esteem issues.

But as mentioned above, this can only happen after the gateway to the unconscious mind has been opened – or in other words, when your client is in a hypnotic trance – meaning your job as a hypnotist is to find the right keys to open this door.

And as you might have experienced, some clients are easy to hypnotize. Whereas others have a more difficult time relaxing and trusting the process, and ultimately going into a trance state.

Both types of clients are great to work with because you get to put the full range of your skills to the test, after all, it would be boring if everyone fell into a trance simply after counting one, two, three!

So the main issue with the latter variety – the clients who are more difficult to hypnotize – is really a matter of time. As fun as hypnotic inductions are, the real change work only begins once someone is in a trance, so it’s important you’re able to induce a trance fairly quickly, especially if you have a packed schedule of clients to see.

But of course, time isn’t the only constraint. After all, not everyone can be hypnotized, sometimes a person’s critical conscious mind is in such a state of high alert it can’t or won’t let their defences down. Perhaps they’re just too skeptical, or maybe they have had people abuse or manipulate them in the past, so they’re wary. Understandably, the conscious mind is simply trying to protect them.

But assuming this isn’t the case, that you’re working with a client who is receptive and believes in the power of hypnosis, however, they’re difficult to hypnotize because they’ve arrived at their session feeling very stressed or distracted, it’s important to have a few tricks up your sleeve to help them quickly relax and get grounded.

There are many hypnosis and self-hypnosis techniques that you can use to do just this, which we share extensively on this blog. But in this article, we’re going to do something a little different and explore some of the yogic breathing techniques that the yogis have long used to see how they can complement your hypnosis skillset. Use them to ground clients before inducing a hypnotic trance to get them into a relaxed state, or share this article with them so they can practice them at home.

How The Breath Can Be Used To Trigger The “Rest & Digest” System For Deep Relaxation

The breath has profound effects on the nervous system, if consciously controlled it can have an energizing or relaxing effect.

Slowing the breath down and gently extending the exhalation activates the “rest and digest” mode (the Parasympathetic Nervous System, PNS). It therefore has a calming and relaxing effect on the body and mind, bringing about a sense of receptivity and centeredness as illustrated in the diagram below:

Yogic Breathing For Hypnosis: 3 Easy Techniques To Ground & Relax Your Clients Before Inducing A Hypnotic Trance

Or as Timothy McCall explains in his breakthrough book, Yoga As Medicine:

“[…] the breath is used to relax the nervous system, which in turn calms the mind. In this state […] you have access to deeper wisdom from within, and both creativity and healing are facilitated.”

To fully derive the benefits of breathing techniques and to subsequently come into a receptive state prior to your session, the type and quality of the breath must first be established.

There are 3 parts to each breath: inhalation, retention and exhalation. The retention and exhalation are key to the health benefits and will be used in the techniques below.

In exhaling at length the lungs are being rid of stale air allowing a deep surge of freshly oxygenated air back in.

Yogic breathing exercises, pranayama (literally meaning breath control) focus on a prolonged retention and exhalation. Pranayama comes from prana meaning life force, or energy. The equivalent in the Chinese system is Chi. Prana is life force energy and vital for nourishing and maintaining the body.

Pranayama techniques are traditional yoga practices to assist in expanding the vital force and channelling it through the nadis (energy channels of the body) to purify and revitalize the body, mind and spirit.

The type of breathing that brings deep and beneficial breath is known as diaphragmatic breathing. In itself this is a yogic practice and of immeasurable benefit in bringing the body and mind into a state of calm and centeredness.

Key to this type of breath is an understanding of how the diaphragm works. The diaphragm is a dome shaped sheet of muscle located under and attached to the ribs. Above it sit the heart and lungs, below it sit the abdominal organs, it is attached to the lower spine by a thick tendon. On inhaling the ribs fill with air the diaphragm contracts and moves down pushing the abdomen outwards. On exhaling the diaphragm relaxes, moving back up and pushing the air out of the lungs, the belly as a result moves in a bit.

Simply put: inhale belly rises, exhale belly falls.

[INFOGRAPHIC] Yogic Breathing For Hypnosis: 3 Easy Techniques To Ground & Relax Your Clients Before Inducing A Hypnotic Trance

In short, these breathing techniques develop concentration by focusing the mind, remove stress and anxiety by creating calmness and peace by activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System (rest and digest mode), plus, they also boost the immune system by lowering the Sympathetic Nervous System (fight or flight) response. The perfect state to put your clients in before hypnosis, wouldn’t you agree?

Additionally, they’re effective tools for your clients to take home with them given that they can be done at home, at work, in the car (with the exception of Nadi Shodhana while driving!). Or for you to use yourself to get into the essential “H+” state so you can help your clients make powerful transformations.

The post Yogic Breathing For Hypnosis: 3 Easy Techniques To Ground & Relax Your Clients Before Inducing A Hypnotic Trance [Includes Infographic] appeared first on Hypnosis Training Academy.

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Is It Hypnosis? – Part Eighteen

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It seems to have been a while since I’ve gone back to my old stories to see if the hypnosis contained within them is at all realistic, and if so whether there are any good lessons to be learned about ethical kink therein. Again, I think this is really valuable; something featuring vampires or tentacled monstrosities or brainwashing helmets is obviously a fantasy, but I think it’s worth discussing what can really be done with hypnosis and why sometimes it really shouldn’t. So let’s get started, shall we?

Exercise One: This one, I think, may fall ever so slightly into that creepy gray area between “nah, you couldn’t possibly” and “let’s never find out, shall we?” Certainly, there are a lot of ways that people have exploited that bond of social conformity to bring people along to extremes of behavior that they wouldn’t otherwise do. There’s a lot of well-known psychological experimentation that demonstrates that humans have an inherent tendency to go along with the group, to say nothing of our tendency to follow authority figures. It’s not at all implausible to imagine that Jessica might find herself in a position where she assumes that if nobody but her has a problem with Professor Doakes’ methods, then it must be her that’s wrong.

Regardless of whether this is possible, it’s very clear from Jessica’s (probably realistic) reactions in the story that it’s going to do extremely awful things to someone’s head to be subjected to this kind of programming, and you shouldn’t do it. If you find yourself wanting to start a sex cult, I really hope it goes without saying that you should check that urge and seek help. Charles Manson, R. Kelly and Keith Raniere are not role models.

Take a Bow: (Private confession – I think this one turned out terrible. Not for reasons of realism; I just never really felt satisfied with it.) In any event, it’s probably not really feasible. You could certainly go a long way toward using hypnosis to assist in method acting, especially with a willing subject; it’s basically just a form of visualization exercise to help you get into character. That part is believable. But the subconscious isn’t easily fooled, and Charles would in all probability snap out of the trance himself even without a handler there to wake him after the cameras stopped rolling. His natural association would be to do so, in fact. Most of this is just contrivance. Hmmm… maybe that is why I never liked it after all?

Fascination: I was torn on whether or not to even put this one in here, because the ‘hypnosis’ is so patently unbelievable as to almost be a magic spell. But the story presents it as a real event with natural causes, a simple stroboscopic fascinator that happens to be extremely powerful due to random chance and hypnotizes the viewer without the need for a formal induction. And also puts the viewer into a trance so deep that they absorb all suggestions irresistibly. And also causes intense pleasure because sure, why not? Needless to say, this one is total bullshit, even if it’s immensely hot total bullshit.

Nobody Does It Better: And speaking of total bullshit… look, do I even have to say that this one is deliberately and consciously ludicrous? It’s an overt parody of the ‘hypnotist’s harem’ style of EMC story, a clear (and hopefully amusing) over the top version of the tropes used in other stories about improbably talented lesbian hypnotists collecting kinky young women like Pokemon and watching them perform for her amusement. Nothing in here is achievable in a million years, probably not even with eager and consenting subjects with a lot of experience going into trance. It’s funny, but it’s not real hypnosis.

Since U Been Gone: I do think it would probably be possible to do this one with a willing subject; certainly, the suggestion provides a self-reinforcing incentive to comply by giving the subject sexual pleasure every time they forget the letter ‘U’. I’m not sure if you could have long-term success with it – or if you would want to, as it would probably wind up being a pain in the ass for a number of reasons – but short-term “forget letters/numbers” is an old hypnosis party trick. That part is pretty believable.

But with an unwilling, or an unwitting subject? Nope. Especially not someone who was a stickler for grammar or spelling. There’d simply be too much incongruence between the conscious and unconscious mind to overcome. Given that I know some spelling sticklers who won’t even read this story, I’m pretty sure that anyone who hated the idea would simply reject the suggestion.

And oh, hey look! That’s another five stories in the books! See you next week for another blog entry, and ((shrug emoji)) for another installment in this series!

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